Wednesday, May 2

the Last of the Dutch Rarities

illustration by Benjamin Rabier, via janwillemsen on Flickr


I'll miss doing these posts. They've been the source of quite a few new additions to my own favorites list, but what's more, they've taught me a lot about Dutch naming sensibilities — about what they really like in a name. (Who knew another country could love the  "-ayden" sound as much as the US?) I've found the lists to be quite playful, full of alternate spellings, unusual variants, pop culture influences, plenty of influences from other cultures (eastern Europe and the middle east especially) and mind-bendingly on-trend — or way ahead of it. It's one of the more interesting and eclectic lists I've had the pleasure of perusing.

Here are the last odds & ends — names that were used just 4 or 5 times in the Netherlands in 2011. Enjoy!

Girls  
Aivy 
Annique — a mixture of Annika/Unique, perhaps
Asude — this is Turkish, I think. Anyone know what it means? 
Davita — the Italian phrase "da vita" means "of life," kinda nice
Elles 
Eslina  
Fabiën — I've liked Fabien for a girl since first hearing it in Pulp Fiction ("I want a pot," anyone?") but never cared for the uber-feminine "-enne" ending. Why not just use this!
Inci 
Issrae   
Julot 
Liselore 
Luke — hmm, sort of surprised I haven't seen this one used on a girl yet  
Marilou — so retro adorable   
Nelleke 
Sundus — an Arabic name referring to "soft silk wrought with gold or silver"
Syra 
Yalou 
Yzze — makes me think of this drink

Boys  
Aalt 
Danian 
Erion 
Fabe — "no no, not Gabe. It's Fabe."
Ferren 
Fimme 
Florentijn  — love the "-tijn" ending for boy names, too
Gerson 
Goof — no kidding   
Güven 
Joa 
Kik  
Lucenzo — Luca + Lorenzo? I actually like it   
Mexz 
Nobel — aspirational naming, can't argue with that
Riquelme 
Santi — sweet 
Silvian 
Sunny — Sunny for a boy, Luke for a girl, why not? 
Veysel 
Wick — seems great for a character in a YA novel or something
Yorn 
Yven 

10 comments:

  1. I loved this series. Any chance you'll do another with a different nationality?

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  2. Good idea, Elizabeth -- anyone have any suggestions?

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  3. Such great ones in that list - Aivy, Liselore, Syra and Veysel are fab.

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  4. To name your child Goof is ridiculous in English, but not in Dutch.
    It's short for the Dutch name Govert, which comes from the Germanic name Godfrid.
    So : Godfrid > Govert > Goof

    Goof is pronounced like the past tense of the english verb 'drive' > 'drove' and than replace the dr- with -G (like : Gove)



    Greetings,
    A Dutch name freak from Holland

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  5. The Dutch boy's name Wick comes from the Germanic name Wichard.

    Gr,
    Dutch name freak

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  6. Thank you so much for the info, Anon!

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  7. In Luke the last e is pronounced as the e in 'the'. So replace the 'th' by Luk. the u is pronounced as an u with umlaut in German. That makes the name more girly i think

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